Search Results

280 items found

  • Distal radius #s: Should we screen for shoulder pathology?

    The impact of shoulder pathology on individuals with distal radius fracture. Doerrer, S. B., et al. (2021) Level of Evidence: 2c Follow recommendation: 👍 👍 👍 Type of study: Symptoms prevalence study Topic: Distal radius fractures - Relevance of shoulder pathology This cross-sectional study assessed the impact of post-traumatic shoulder pain onset in people with a distal radius fracture. A total of 45 participants were included in the study. Participants were included if they had a distal radius fracture and reported no shoulder impairments/pain prior to distal radius fracture. To assess the impact of shoulder injury on recovery post distal radius fracture, function, kinesiophobia, and pain intensity were assessed. The results showed that one third of participants presented with shoulder pain following a distal radius fracture. In addition, those participants who developed shoulder pain, presented with greater fear of movement and higher levels of pain intensity. Disclaimer: This publication was reviewed and assessed by one reviewer only and it reflects their interpretation. Readers should come to their own conclusions by reading the original article. Clinical Take Home Message: Based on what we know today, following a distal radius fracture, it is useful to screen for shoulder movemement and pain. Thosed people who present with a concurrent shoulder injury appear to be in greater overall pain and present with higher levels of kinesiophobia. Considering that kinesiophobia and pain catastrophising are associated with higher levels of disability, this group of clients may need some extra care. In addition, balance and frailty screening is important in older people with a distal radius fracture. As a matter of fact, after a distal radius fracture, frail clients are 5 times more likely to have another fracture in the coming year compared to their healthy counterparts. URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jht.2021.09.002 Available through The Journal of Hand Therapy for HTNZ members. Available through EBSCO Health Databases for PNZ members. Abstract Background Shoulder pathology can occur concurrently with a distal radius fracture (DRF) but few studies have examined this population. Purpose The purpose of this study was to expand the understanding of the impact of shoulder pathology on individuals with DRF. Study Design: Mixed Methods Design. Methods A total of 45 participants with a DRF were categorized into a DRF only (n = 29) and shoulder pathology concurrent with DRF (SPCDRF) (n = 16) groups. Quantitative data gathered included demographics, Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand, Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia-11, Visual Analog Scale, and Compensatory Mechanism Checklist. Qualitative interviews were performed with 7 participants in the SPCDRF group. Within group correlations were analyzed via the Spearman Rank. The Mann Whitney U test was used to compare the two groups. Qualitative analysis was performed to describe the experience of participants in the SPCDRF group. A mixed methods analysis compared quantitative and qualitative data. Results Sixteen participants (35.6%) in the sample presented with shoulder pathology; 6 participants (37.5%) presented at initial evaluation due to the fall; 10 participants (62.5%) developed shoulder pathology due to compensation or disuse. Average number of days to develop shoulder pathology after the DRF was 43 days. SPCDRF participants had significantly greater pain levels (p = .02) and more activity avoidance (p = .03) than the DRF only group. Four qualitative themes emerged: It's difficult to perform occupations and changes had to be made; There is fear and uncertainty; The impact of pain; Tried to be normal but could not Mixed methods analysis found that qualitative data further illuminated quantitative findings. Conclusions Individuals with shoulder pathology concurrent with a DRF may present with higher pain levels and avoid activity more. In addition, they may describe fearfulness in using their injured upper extremity especially if they have high levels of pain. Study Design Mixed Methods Design. publications = Total number of papers citing this research supporting = Citation statements supporting the findings mentioning = Neutral citation statements contrasting = Citation statements not supporting the findings

  • Pain catastrophising: Is it associated with disability at 6 months post distal radius #?

    Severity of persistent pain and disability can accurately screen for presence of pain catastrophizing and fear of performing wrist movements in individuals with distal radius fracture. Mahdavi, M., et al. (2021) Level of Evidence: 2c Follow recommendation: 👍 👍 👍 Type of study: Symptoms prevalence study Topic: Psychology in upper limb conditions - Pain catastrophising and disability This is a cross-sectional study assessing the association between pain/function and psychological factors in participants who had a distal radius fracture six months earlier. A total of 85 participants were included in the study. Pain and function were measured through the patient-rated wrist evaluation (PRWE) questionnaire. Psychological factors measured include pain catastrophising, emotional well-being (e.g. depression, anxiety, stress), and kinesiophobia. The results showed that higher levels of pain/functional impairments were associated with greater pain catastrophising, lower emotional well-being, and greater fear of movement (kinesiophobia). Disclaimer: This publication was reviewed and assessed by one reviewer only and it reflects their interpretation. Readers should come to their own conclusions by reading the original article. Clinical Take Home Message: Based on what we know today, catastrophising, mental health issues, and fear of movement contribute to pain and disability in clients who had a distal radius fracture six months prior. These findings are consistent with a previous systematic review. Rather than immobilising these clients, pain neurophysiology education in combination with graded exercise may be a better alternative. Following tissue healing, reassuring clients by explaining that pain is probably associated with tissue sensitivity rather than actual tissue damage may be a useful approach. If you would like to test your pain neuroscience knowledge, have a look at this synopsis. URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2468781221001582 Available through EBSCO Health Databases for PNZ members. Abstract Background The evidence indicating presence of psychological factors concerns in individuals who report persistent residual pain and disability over a longer term after distal radius fractures (DRF) is emerging but requires further inquiry. Objectives To examine the associations of persistent wrist pain and disability at 6-months after DRF with the presence of psychological factors. Methods Eighty-five patients with DRF were evaluated for wrist pain and disability with subscales of Patient-rated wrist evaluation (PRWE), 6-months after the fracture. The associations of wrist pain and disability with these psychological factors at 6-months after DRF were examined using multivariable logistic regression models. The ability of PRWE scores at 6-months after DRF to accurately classify individuals with and without these psychological factors was examined using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results Higher PRWE-P scores were significantly associated with worse pain catastrophizing, having emotional distress, and fear of performing wrist movements. In addition, higher PRWE-F scores were also highly associated with worse pain catastrophizing, having emotional distress, and fear of performing wrist movements. The PRWE-P or PRWE-F Scores of ≥18/50 showed the best combination of sensitivity and specificity in identifying individuals with pain catastrophizing, emotional distress, and fear of performing wrist movements at 6-months after DRF (AUC values of ≥0.88). Conclusion The novel finding of this study is that scores of ≥18/50 PRWE-P or PRWEF can be used to screen for the presence of these psychological factors. publications = Total number of papers citing this research supporting = Citation statements supporting the findings mentioning = Neutral citation statements contrasting = Citation statements not supporting the findings

  • What about encouraging daily activities post distal radius ORIF? Well done Julie!

    “The more I do, the more I can do”: Perspectives on how performing daily activities and occupations influences recovery after surgical repair of a distal radius fracture. Collis, J. M., E. C. Mayland, V. Wright-St Clair and N. Signal (2021) Level of Evidence: 4 Follow recommendation: 👍 👍 Type of study: Therapeutic Topic: Conservative treatment - Distal radius fracture This is a qualitative prospective study assessing the experience of people involved in daily activities following open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) of a distal radius fracture. Qualitative research is not my strength so if you spot any mistakes or incorrect interpretations, please leave a comment! A total of 21 participants were included in the study. Participants were included if they presented with a distal radius fracture ORIF, which was deemed stable and suitable for mobilisation by week 4 post-op. Participants were excluded if they had an additional fracture or surgery for the repair of other structures. In addition, if they had any other conditions impairing the use of the affected hand, they were excluded. Semi-structured interviews were utilised to collect data about participants' experiences in association with involvement in daily activities. An activity log was also completed by participants in order to gather information about the activities they were involved with. The results showed that more than 50% of participants were completing some daily activities by week 3 and that 100% of participants were engaged in some form of daily activity by week 6. The results of the interviews identified several themes. In particular, participants reported daily activities being helpful for recovery, spurring the use of the affected hand in a graded way, giving wrist movement a purpose, gradually exposing the wrist to loads and reducing fear, and challenging not only physical but also psychological aspects involved in the recovery post a distal radius fracture ORIF. Disclaimer: This publication was reviewed and assessed by one reviewer only and it reflects their interpretation. Readers should come to their own conclusions by reading the original article. Clinical Take Home Message: Based on what we know today, involvement in daily activities appears to facilitate recovery following distal radius fracture ORIF. In particular, these meaningful activities not only facilitate wrist movements but also provide clients with psychological benefits. Early mobilisation of a distal radius fracture ORIF should not be an issue and in fact, it may provide better results compared to delayed mobilisation. In particular, two weeks post-surgery, wrist mobilisation should be encouraged. Also remember that in certain clients with a distal radius fracture, bone density scans may be advisable. If you are interested in distal radius fractures, have a look at the full collection! URL: https://doi.org/10.1080/09638288.2021.1936219 Available through EBSCO Health Databases for PNZ members. Abstract Purpose The study aimed to explore perceptions and experiences about how engaging in daily activities and occupations influenced recovery in the first eight weeks after surgical treatment of a distal radius fracture. Methods Twenty-one adults completed an online activity and exercise log then participated in a semi-structured interview between weeks 6 and 8 postoperatively. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using reflexive thematic analysis. Results Daily activities and occupations were highly influential in facilitating recovery of movement and function of the operated limb. Five themes provided an understanding of how occupation operated to promote recovery. Occupation was (i) a primary driver of the rehabilitative process, providing an impetus for recovery, (ii) offered ready-to-hand challenges for opportunistic, automatic movement, (iii) invited intentional use of the affected wrist, (iv) habituated the wrist to movement through repetition and confidence-building, and (iv) drew on psychosocial resources to enable reengagement with life activities and roles. Conclusions Incorporating the performance of graded, modified activities during the early weeks of rehabilitation creates opportunities for wrist movement, enhances wellbeing, and assists in the habituation of wrist movement. Activities and occupations can be used as a therapeutic strategy to promote recovery from surgical treatment of a distal radius fracture. publications = Total number of papers citing this research supporting = Citation statements supporting the findings mentioning = Neutral citation statements contrasting = Citation statements not supporting the findings

  • Does splinting make such a difference for De Quervain tenosynovitis?

    A prospective randomized clinical trial of prescription of full-time versus as-desired splint wear for de Quervain tendinopathy. Menendez, M. E., E. Thornton, S. Kent, T. Kalajian and D. Ring (2015) Level of Evidence: 2b Follow recommendation: 👍 👍 👍 Type of study: Treatment Topic: De Quervain - Splint wearing This is a randomised controlled trial assessing the effectiveness of full time vs part-time splint wearing in people with De Quervain tenosynovitis. Participants were included if they were diagnosed with de Quervain tendinopathy by a hand surgeon. Potential participants were excluded if they were pregnant. A total of 58 participants were allocated to either full-time splint wearing (n=26) or part-time (n=32) splint wearing. All participants were provided with a forearm-based thumb spica splint, which they were either advised to wear full time (except for showering) or as desired. Pain anxiety, the QuickDASH, pain catastrophising, numerical pain scale (NRS), and depression were assessed at baseline and follow up (7.5 weeks). The results showed that there were no statistically or clinically significant differences between groups. Both groups showed some improvement despite it not reaching clinical relevance. The results also showed that greater disability at 7.5 weeks is associated with greater depressive symptoms at baseline. Disclaimer: This publication was reviewed and assessed by one reviewer only and it reflects their interpretation. Readers should come to their own conclusions by reading the original article. Clinical Take Home Message: Based on what we know today, depression may contribute to higher levels of disability after conservative treatment in de Quervain tendinopathy. It is possible that a tailored approach to modify psychological factors in those with higher levels of mental health issues could help reduce disability in clients with de Quervain. These findings are not surprising considering that most upper limb conditions disability is mediated by mental health (e.g. kinesiophobia, depression). URL: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00264-015-2779-6 Abstract PURPOSE: There is no consensus on the best protocol for splint wear in the non-operative management of de Quervain tendinopathy. This study aimed to determine if there is a difference between prescription of strict splint wear compared to selective splint wear in patients with de Quervain tendinopathy. We tested the primary null hypothesis that there is no difference in upper-extremity disability eight weeks after initiating splinting between patients prescribed full-time or as-desired splint wear. Secondary study questions addressed differences in grip strength, pain intensity, and treatment satisfaction. Additionally, we evaluated the influence of psychological factors on disability. METHODS: Eighty-three patients diagnosed with de Quervain tendinopathy were randomly allocated into two different splint-wearing instructions: full-time wear (N = 43) or as-desired wear (N = 40). At enrollment, patients had grip strength measured and completed measures of upper-extremity disability, pain intensity, and psychological distress. An average of 7.5 weeks later, patients returned for a second visit. Analysis was by intention-to-treat and with use of mean imputation for missing data. RESULTS: Fifty-eight patients (70 %; 26 in the full-time cohort and 32 in the as-desired cohort) completed the study. There were no statistically significant differences in disability (p = 0.77), grip strength (p = 0.82), pain intensity (p = 0.36), and treatment satisfaction (p = 0.91) between patients instructed to wear the splint full-time and those instructed to use it as desired. Disability at final evaluation correlated significantly with baseline levels of pain anxiety (p = 0.008), catastrophic thinking (p = 0.001), and symptoms of depression (p < 0.001). The best multivariable linear regression model included symptoms of depression alone and accounted for 32 % of the variability in disability (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: There is no difference in patient-reported outcomes and grip strength with prescription of full-time or as-desired splinting, and patients can wear the splint as they prefer. These results suggest that splinting for de Quervain tendinopathy is palliative at best and strict rest is not disease modifying. publications = Total number of papers citing this research supporting = Citation statements supporting the findings mentioning = Neutral citation statements contrasting = Citation statements not supporting the findings

  • Answer - What is the differential diagnosis for this atrophy associated with forearm pain?

    A rare and severe case of pronator teres syndrome. Moura, F. S. E. and A. Agarwal (2020) Level of Evidence: 5 Follow recommendation: 👍 Type of study: Diagnostic/Therapeutic Topic: Median nerve entrapment - Pronator teres This is the answer to last week Sherlock Handy. The patient was a 57 years old presenting with left volar forearm pain and grip/pinch strength weakness, which developed over the course of 5 years. They had a history of cancer, which was in remission. They had no symptoms at night. There was atrophy of the thenar eminence (see picture) and reduced sensation in the thumb, index, middle finger and thenar eminence. Carpal tunnel tests were negative. Neurological examination identified no central nervous system pathology. Nerve conduction studies identified no sensory impairments but a severe left median nerve neuropathy below the elbow. During surgical exploration, entrapment of the median nerve was identified at the level of the pronator teres, and this was released. In addition, the flexor digitorum superficialis' arch, which is another potential area of median nerve entrapment, was also released. Follow up at 8 weeks showed some sensory and motor improvements, with some ability to perform thumb ipj flexion. Disclaimer: This publication was reviewed and assessed by one reviewer only and it reflects their interpretation. Readers should come to their own conclusions by reading the original article. Clinical take home message: Based on what we know today, severe entrapment of the median nerve at the pronator teres entry is a rare presentation. The differential diagnosis for this presentation included cervical entrapment radiculopathy, a median nerve entrapment at the lacertus fibrosus, brachial neuritis, thoracic outlet syndrome, and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), or a central nervous system pathology. If you enjoyed this synopsis I am sure that you will enjoy this one too. Open Access URL: https://doi.org/10.1093/jscr/rjaa397 Abstract We present the case of a patient with severe symptoms of proximal forearm median nerve neuropathy. Over the course of 5 years his condition progressed to encompass rare features of combined pronator teres syndrome (PTS) and anterior interosseous nerve syndrome (AINS). The aetiology was found to be pronator teres compression and was managed successfully by surgical decompression. Proximal forearm median nerve compression should be considered as a continuum with two classic endpoints. At one end of the spectrum pure PTS presents with solely or mainly sensory symptoms, whereas at the other end AINS presents with pure motor symptoms. Hence, all possible anatomical sites of compression must be surgically explored in all cases of PTS or AINS, regardless of symptomatology. Timely referral to an experienced specialist is encouraged to ensure good outcomes, whenever a primary care practitioner encounters an atypical carpal tunnel syndrome-like presentation. publications = Total number of papers citing this research supporting = Citation statements supporting the findings mentioning = Neutral citation statements contrasting = Citation statements not supporting the findings

  • How can you speed up return to work in your clients with hand conditions? ReHand may help!

    Feedback-guided exercises performed on a tablet touchscreen improve return to work, function, strength and healthcare usage more than an exercise program prescribed on paper for people with wrist, hand or finger injuries: a randomised trial. Blanquero, J., et al. (2020) Level of Evidence: 1b- Follow recommendation: 👍 👍 👍 Type of study: Therapeutic Topic: ReHand - Benefits for rehabilitation This is a randomised controlled trial assessing the effectiveness of an interactive iPad home exercise programme (HEP) compared to traditional HEP in people with bone and soft tissue hand conditions. A total of 74 participants took part in this study. Participants were included if they presented fractures of the distal radius/metacarpal/phalanges or other soft tissues injuries including sprains of the wrist/fingers. In the experimental group (n=40), the HEP was completed on the iPad through the ReHand app, which allowed participants to use their fingers/wrist to interact and complete the exercise sessions. In addition, the ReHand app digitally recorded compliance and sent reports to the clinicians. The control group (n=34) received the same exercises but prescribed on paper. Compliance in the control group was assessed verbally. The effectiveness of each intervention was assessed by the return to work time (number of days) and the number of appointments required. The results showed that the experimental group returned to work earlier by the very least 3 days. In addition, the number of appointments required was reduced by at least one session in the experimental group. Disclaimer: This publication was reviewed and assessed by one reviewer only and it reflects their interpretation. Readers should come to their own conclusions by reading the original article. Clinical Take Home Message: Based on what we know today, utilising interactive solutions for the completion of HEP and clients monitoring may speed up recovery in people with hand conditions. In particular, the implementation of ReHand appears to be useful in hastening return to work and reducing the number of appointments required. In addition to utilising this technology, keeping the number of exercises prescribed small may also double compliance with your treatment! URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1836955320301077 Available through EBSCO Health Databases for PNZ members. Abstract Question In people with bone and soft tissue injuries of the wrist, hand and/or fingers, do feedback-guided exercises performed on a tablet touchscreen hasten return to work, reduce healthcare usage and improve clinical recovery more than a home exercise program prescribed on paper? Design Randomised, parallel-group trial with concealed allocation, assessor blinding and intention-to-treat analysis. Participants Seventy-four workers with limited functional ability due to bone and soft tissue injuries of the wrist, hand and/or fingers. Intervention Participants in the experimental and control groups received the same in-patient physiotherapy and occupational therapy. Participants in the experimental group received a home exercise program using the ReHand tablet application, which guides exercises performed on a tablet touchscreen with feedback, monitoring and progression. Participants in the control group were prescribed an evidence-based home exercise program on paper. Outcome measures The primary outcome was the time taken to return to work. Secondary outcomes included: healthcare usage (number of clinical appointments); and functional ability, pain intensity, and grip and pinch strength 2 and 4 weeks after randomisation. Results Compared with the control group, the experimental group: returned to work sooner (MD –18 days, 95% CI –33 to –3); required fewer physiotherapy sessions (MD –7.4, 95% CI –13.1 to –1.6), rehabilitation consultations (MD –1.9, 95% CI –3.6 to 0.3) and plastic surgery consultations (MD –3.6, 95% CI –6.3 to –0.9); and had better short-term recovery of functional ability and pinch strength. Conclusion In people with bone and soft-tissue injuries of the wrist, hand and/or fingers, prescribing a feedback-guided home exercise program using a tablet-based application instead of a conventional program on paper hastened return to work and improved the short-term recovery of functional ability and pinch strength, while reducing the number of required healthcare appointments. Trial registration ACTRN12619000344190 publications = Total number of papers citing this research supporting = Citation statements supporting the findings mentioning = Neutral citation statements contrasting = Citation statements not supporting the findings

  • How can you improve proprioception and motor control in thumb OA?

    Practical exercises for thumb proprioception. Cantero-Téllez, R. and I. Medina Porqueres (2021) Level of Evidence: 5 Follow recommendation: 👍 Type of study: Therapeutic Topic: Thumb proprioception - Exercises This is an expert opinion on what exercises can be utilised to improve thumb proprioception. These exercises can be implemented in a series of thumb conditions including post-traumatic rehabilitation and persistent pain. My favourites are the tennis ball one and the force matching one (see pictures below). Clinical Take Home Message: Based on what we know today, several proprioception exercises can be utilised for the rehabilitation of the thumb. I think this may be useful in those conditions where such impairments have been identified. For example, people with symptomatic hand OA have been shown to present with force control impairments (gripping and pinching) and joint position sense is impaired in clients with symptomatic thumb OA. It is, therefore, possible that exercises aiming at proprioception could be beneficial. Further experimental studies are however required to assess whether these proprioceptive impairments improve after training. URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jht.2020.03.005 Available through The Journal of Hand Surgery (American Volume) for HTNZ members. Available through EBSCO Health Databases for PNZ members. No abstract available publications = Total number of papers citing this research supporting = Citation statements supporting the findings mentioning = Neutral citation statements contrasting = Citation statements not supporting the findings

  • What is the differential diagnosis for this atrophy associated with forearm pain?

    Level of Evidence: 5 Follow recommendation: 👍 Type of study: Diagnostic/Therapeutic Have a think about this case study. Leave a diagnostic comment if you like. I will publish the diagnosis reported by the paper next week. The patient was a 57 years old presenting with left volar forearm pain and grip/pinch strength weakness, which developed over the course of 5 years. They had a history of cancer, which was in remission. They had no symptoms at night. There was atrophy of the thenar eminence (see picture) and reduced sensation in the thumb, index, middle finger and thenar eminence. Carpal tunnel tests were negative. Neurological examination identified no central nervous system pathology. What was it?

  • Does Kinesio taping reduce pain in LE? Don't despair, you can still use it for decoration!

    Evaluation of short-term and residual effects of Kinesio taping in chronic lateral epicondylitis: A randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial. Balevi, I. S. Y., B. Karaoglan, E. B. Batur and N. Acet (2021) Level of Evidence: 1b- Follow recommendation: 👍 👍 👍 👍 Type of study: Therapeutic Topic: Lateral epicondylalgia – Kinesio taping This is a randomised placebo-controlled trial assessing the effectiveness of inhibitory vs a placebo Kinesio tape for lateral epicondylalgia. Fifty participants were included in the present study. To be included, participants had to present with pain at the lateral epicondyle, and present with pain on at least one of the following tests: resisted wrist extension, resisted supination, and third finger extension. Participants were randomised to either the "inhibitory" Kinesio tape or placebo Kinesio tape (see pictures). Both groups received stretching and resistance exercises for the wrist extensors. The treatment lasted six weeks for both groups. Pain was assessed through the numerical rating scale at baseline and follow-up. The results showed that both groups improved to a clinically and statistically significant level at 6 weeks. However, there were no differences between groups. Disclaimer: This publication was reviewed and assessed by one reviewer only and it reflects their interpretation. Readers should come to their own conclusions by reading the original article. Clinical Take Home Message: Based on what we know today, "inhibitory" Kinesio taping is no more effective than a placebo for lateral epicondylalgia (LE). Currently, the best option for lateral epicondylalgia appears to involve an initial rest followed by graded resistance training. Based on the current evidence, PRP and surgery for LE do not appear to be more effective than placebo and are much more costly than conservative treatment. If you were thinking about cortisone injections, they appear to increase the recurrence rate at one year and may not be the best option either. If you would like to get a more complete picture of lateral epicondylalgia, have a look at the whole collection. URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jht.2021.09.001 Available through The Journal of Hand Therapy for HTNZ members. Available through EBSCO Health Databases for PNZ members. Abstract BACKGROUND Lateral epicondylitis is degenerative tendinosis of the extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle and is the most common work/sports-related chronic musculoskeletal problem affecting the elbow. PURPOSE This study aimed to evaluate the short term and residual effectiveness of the Kinesio taping method on pain, grip force, quality of life, and functionality. STUDY DESIGN Randomized, double-blinded, controlled study. METHODS Subjects were 50 patients diagnosed with chronic unilateral lateral epicondylitis with a symptom duration of at least 12 weeks. During the first four weeks, the study group received a true inhibitor Kinesio taping while the control group received sham taping. In both groups, progressive stretching and strengthening exercises were given as a home program for six weeks. The primary outcome measure was the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) for self-report of pain intensity; secondary outcome measures were Cyriax resistive muscle test evaluation, maximal grip strength, Patient- Rated Tennis Elbow Evaluation (PRTEE), and Short Form-36 (SF-36). After the treatment, patients were evaluated by the first assessor who was blinded to taping types. RESULTS There was a significant decrease in NRS scores overtime during the first four weeks in both groups (P < .001,) and effect sizes were large. There was no significant difference in Cyriax muscle resistance test maximal grip strength between groups (P > .05). However, there was a significant improvement in muscle strength of elbow extension and pronation in the study group detected in the intragroup analysis. Intragroup comparisons also showed a significant improvement in all subunits of the PRTEE and SF-36 except energy/vitality, social functioning, and pain in both groups (P < .05) with moderate to high effect sizes. PRTEE pain scores were significantly decreased in the study group compared to the placebo group (P < .05, d = 0.48). CONCLUSION The effects of Kinesio taping on muscle strength, quality of life, and function in chronic lateral epicondylitis are not superior to placebo. However, NRS scores showed that in the two weeks after Kinesio taping treatment, pain reduction persisted as a residual effect which may improve the exercise adherence and functionality. publications = Total number of papers citing this research supporting = Citation statements supporting the findings mentioning = Neutral citation statements contrasting = Citation statements not supporting the findings

  • Gaming clients? Not a problem, here is evidence based advice

    Gamer's health guide: Optimizing performance, recognizing hazards, and promoting wellness in esports. Emara, A. K., et al. (2020) Level of Evidence: 5 Follow recommendation: 👍 Type of study: Therapeutic Topic: Gaming – Guidelines for prevention and treatment This is an expert opinion on prevention and treatment of musculoskeletal conditions for gamers. As you can see from the picture below, several upper limb regions can present with musculoskeletal impairments and several body systems can be affected. Wrist pain is often reported in these clients (30% to 36%) and biomechanical factors are likely playing a role. Thus, during intensive gaming activities, players can reach up to 600 moves per minute, which would equate to 10 finger/wrist actions per second, which may be performed over several hours. Additional factors such as sedentary behaviors, mental health issues (e.g. depression, addictive tendencies), poor sleep, and nutrition are likely to contribute to the onset of persistent pain or contribute to a slower recovery following an upper limb injury. The interventions adopted must therefore include not only biomechanical and ergonomic modifications, but also psychosocial interventions aimed at modifying the other contributing factors to pain and musculoskeletal impairments. In addition, the use of virtual or augmented reality games may be helpful in reducing sedentary behaviours. Platform such as Zwift are new gaming consoles that make stationary cycling much more entertaining. Going forward in the future, there will be lots of options for our gaming clients which will help reducing sedentary time and possibly utilise other body parts to take part in gaming. The table below presents with an exhaustive list of interventions that these clients are likely to require. Disclaimer: This publication was reviewed and assessed by one reviewer only and it reflects their interpretation. Readers should come to their own conclusions by reading the original article. Clinical Take Home Message: Based on what we know today, our professional and amateurs game players are at higher risks of upper limb musculoskeletal conditions due to a series of biomechanical and psychosocial factors. An holistic approaching to their assessment and treatment a may be useful for their rehabilitation. Remember that not all musculoskeletal pain presentations are due to overuse syndromes and that other factors may play a significant role in the pain experience. If you want to assess your pain neurophysiology understanding, test yourself through this questionnaire! Open access URL: https://doi.org/10.1249/jsr.0000000000000787 Abstract Electronic sports (esports), or competitive video gaming, is a rapidly growing industry and phenomenon. While around 90% of American children play video games recreationally, the average professional esports athlete spends 5.5 to 10 h gaming daily. These times and efforts parallel those of traditional sports activities where individuals can participate at the casual to the professional level with the respective time commitments. Given the rapid growth in esports, greater emphasis has been placed on identification, management, and prevention of common health hazards that are associated with esports participation while also focusing on the importance of health promotion for this group of athletes. This review outlines a three-point framework for sports medicine providers, trainers, and coaches to provide a holistic approach for the care of the esports athlete. This esports framework includes awareness and management of common musculoskeletal and health hazards, opportunities for health promotion, and recommendations for performance optimization. publications = Total number of papers citing this research supporting = Citation statements supporting the findings mentioning = Neutral citation statements contrasting = Citation statements not supporting the findings